The Essential Organization for Animal Welfare

In times of recession people’s generosity for worthy causes can be put to the test. The UK is known as a nation of animal lovers but the fact that such a large organisation is required to look after animal welfare in the country suggests that not everyone shares the nation’s love of animals.

There are natural disasters occurring all too frequently around the world and people’s natural instincts are often to ensure that help is sent; be it for victims of a tsunami, an earthquake or flooding. In times of emergency and disaster such a response can renew faith in humanity.

Animal Welfare

Unseen hard work

On a daily basis many charitable organizations face the challenge of handling the problems in their specific sector whether they are related to animals, the sick, children or the elderly. It may not make the headlines but it is nevertheless essential work.

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals remains one of the largest charities in the UK; it is a longstanding charity, the largest and oldest animal charity in the world. It is on hand to help animals of all kinds, to save and relocate pets and wild animals.

While it relies largely on donations and certainly doesn’t receive any central funding towards day to day activities as such, it does get some funds to pay for the costs of private prosecution.

It encourages all members of the public to get in touch either to highlight a situation that needs urgent attention or perhaps to volunteer to help in a practical way by taking an unwanted animal.

Historical

It had been in existence for a few years before Queen Victoria granted it the royal charter in 1840; it has a long and successful history and is worthy of public support. It competes for donations however with a host of other charities. Charitable status has been awarded to many worthy causes; several fund research in their area of dedication and so there is continual pressure for funding.

Even when it comes to animals some people’s sentiments lead them towards a wider subject; the actual threat to endangered species worldwide, the tiger, rhino, orang-utan and panda.

Organisation

Some local branches are registered separately from the ‘parent body’ and run entirely by volunteers. They raise their funds within the locality and look to help any sick animals in the area. On very rare occasions when there is no alternative the Society has to use euthanasia as the final solution but it has successfully released and rehoused millions of animals in its history.

There are many RSPCA shops, as well as hospital centres. It is a comprehensive service covering the country dealing with both pets and wild animals. There are few who do not know what the letters RSPCA stand for and fewer who do not respect the wonderful work that they do.

Some take the Society for granted; it has been present for so long and yet there are many ways that people can make a contribution to the welfare of the UK’s animals.